A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel

Madeleine L’Engle’s novel A Wrinkle in Time was originally published in 1962. Hope Larsen adapted and illustrated this novel and published in 2012. I’ve not yet read the original, but I believe the text is comparable and the illustrations add another layer to the story.

This is a novel that I requested for my 8 year-old son to read. I recommend this to him and he read it in less than a day. Instead of waiting to get the original novel, I read the graphic novel in order to talk to him about it.

This novel follows a group of children who have to travel through time and space to save their father. Meg Murry is an ordinary child with an extraordinary brother Charlie. Their father has been missing for awhile and no one knows if he’ll return. Charlie befriends their strange neighbors and another schoolmate of Megs, all of which have strange abilities that help them communicate with other people. Its some sort of telepathy and ability to see the future combined with extreme empathy and the ability to hop through the wrinkles in space and time. The other world that they find themselves is a negative utopia with mind control and order being the goal.

Having been written in the 1960’s, there’s probably a glimpse into communism and the Cold War that I didn’t put much thought into while reading it. Its also a little similar to religions with one being knowing whats best for everyone, but I really read it with my 8 year-old in mind.

This was a fun, interesting read with a strong moral lesson that we need to stand up for what’s right and we all have the power to do that. I plan on reading the non-graphic novel after it comes, and I may put more effort into the symbolism at that point. Or maybe, I’ll just enjoy the read…

Read August 2017

The Orchardist

The Orchardist is an amazing story about William Talmadge, a quiet man living an isolated life in a Washington orchard until one day 2 pregnant girls start stealing food from him. Its very clear that these girls are terrified but need someone’s help and Talmadge can’t turn them out. He slowly cares for them and gets them help with their pregnancies. The girls never warm to him, but when Talmadge learns of their past, he understands their reluctance and accepts what they are able to offer. Their life is turned upside down when someone from their past comes to collect them. Decisions are made that affect the rest of their lives. We’re able to follow most of the characters throughout their entire lives and see how these decisions impacted their futures.

The setting adds an interesting element to the story. The isolation allows a self awareness to the characters and a coldness to their interactions. But the love between many of them is felt on a level that most families cannot experience. A simple hand on the passing shoulder screams volumes that are never spoken. The style reminds me of much older novels and this work has been compared to works by Steinbeck and I understand why.

This tragic story is filled with the love and care true families have for one another. Regardless of proximity or blood.

Great novel! It’ll be interesting to read additional works by Coplin to see if she can continue in this style. She based this novel on an area that she grew up with and types of people she knew. I’d love to see her do it again.

Read June 2017

and when she was good

Laura Lippman delivers a very questionable heroine in and when she was good. Heloise Lewis grew up unwanted and average, the daughter of a man’s second unwanted family. There was always someone or something better than her and her mother.

We meet her about 20 years later as she’s trying to keep her world from falling apart. As a suburban madam and escort, she’s built an incredibly lucrative career with a silent partner that is currently in jail. We are slowly immersed into her strange dealings with the johns, her employees, and her former pimp. The story is intertwined with learning about her history and how she became a 38 year old suburban mom running a discrete business.

Trust is incredibly important in her world and while many people need to trust Heloise, there are few that she can trust to prevent her worlds from colliding. When other madams start dying, Heloise knows its time to get out of the business and escape from her silent partner. But secrets have a way of coming out hiding and some of them are worth killing for.

Great mystery!

 

Read December 2016

Never Tell

In Never Tell, Alafair Burke tells the tale of Julia Whitmore’s death and how Detective Ellie Hatcher went against all of her instincts to investigate what looked like a clear cut suicide. Ellie is brought into the wealthy NYC world where kids attend exclusive prep schools that protect their name over their students, take drugs to help study harder, and where parents spend the week at the Hamptons while their 16 year old daughter has her own apartment suite in their house.

Det. Hatcher fights all her gut feelings to investigate this non-crime. She dives into the world of homeless kids living in a shelter and who’re paid to participate in drug trials. There are so many swirling worlds coming together, but its the ones that go back the furthest that seem to matter the most.

This was a suspenseful, exciting read. The first I’ve read by Alifair Burke and not my last.

Read July 2016.

Restless in the Grave

I finished Dana Shugak’s Restless in the Grave over a month ago after starting and stopping the book for at least a month. This should have been an easy, fun mystery, but it just dragged on for me. I couldn’t pinpoint what my problem with the book was, so I have no helpful criticism. Just a bad review without rationale.

This is another book set in Alaska where a woman Private Investigator, Kate Shugak, helps the police find out what happened when an experienced pilot crashes his plane. But at this point, I can’t remember many details and I don’t really want to put more thought into this book.

Read August 2015.

The Beautiful Mystery

The Beautiful Mystery is not the first novel by Louise Penny, but its the first I’ve read. I was immediately blown away by the relationship between the Chief Inspector Armand Gamache and his partner Jean-Guy Beauvoir. Theirs is a paternal relationship with the elder Gamache filling a father role as well as boss and mentor. One is thoughtful while the other is all about action.

The two are an interesting pair as they enter the closed monastery of Saint-Gilbert-Entre-les-Loups, a Catholic order so reclusive they were lost to the Vatican for hundreds of years. Penny details the imaginary beauty of this silent monastery as well as the ethereal quality of the music. Its easy to get lost with all the interesting characters that pop up in the investigation of a murdered monk as well as the love of the ancient chants that the order sings in prayer to God.

This closed murder investigation has a twist when a Vatican monk who works in the office formally known as the Inquisittion shows up suddenly without prior knowledge of the dead monk. Is there a Catholic conspiracy or a plain old murder here? Louise Penny delivers a beautifully told story that has the reader handing on every word yet the motive of the murderer remains hidden until the end of the novel. Throughout the story the main detectives delighted me with their personal journeys and obvious affection for each other.

This was another recommendation from my aunt-in-law and this author is sure to become one of my favorites.

Read May 2015

Beautiful Ruins

Jess Walter’s Beautiful Ruins is told with time jumps from 1962 to present day, where the past affects the future in all the characters. Just south of Cinque Terre in 1962, a young movie star comes ashore in a remote village which is only accessible by boat. The local owner of the hotel, already obsessing about turning his village into the next place for Americans to escape, watches over his guest with his own future in mind. Meanwhile, a has-been movie producer in present day Hollywood has a surprise visitor from his past.

Jess Walter’s introduces all his characters with purpose and they all tie the story together. This includes the enigmatic Elizabeth Taylor, who never appears in the novel, but is referenced by all the characters because in 1962, when half the book takes place, a young Liz is filming Cleopatra in Rome, not far from the picturesque Italian village.

Having the plot jump back and forth can be jarring to a reader, but Walters keeps everything smooth in his telling. He also keeps everyone guessing as to what secrets have been covered up for 50 years and who will be most impacted by their revelation.

This was a beautiful story of people living their lives with all the good and bad out for the reader to see. Jess Walter writes compassionately about all his characters, even in their selfish awfulness.

Read April 2015