Hour of the Wolf

Hakan Nesser allows us insight into the murderer’s mind in the Hour of the Wolf when we see the first accidental murder and the following cover-ups to hide the crime. Alongside the murderer, we follow the investigation led by Chief Inspector Reinhart, Van Veeteren’s successor. When Van Veeteren’s son turns up murdered and left in a ditch, the whole team must work tirelessly to find their mentor’s son’s killer.

The murdered confounds the police since the crimes are not decisively connected. The first murder seems completely unrelated but is the key to understanding what happened and what will happen. Van Veeteren must also come to terms with his son’s past and how it connected to his murder. The key to understanding the crime comes from him with his ability to look into a criminal’s thought process to deduce the reasoning behind the crimes.

Good read.

Read October 2017

 

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The Unlucky Lottery

After the thick, superficial novel I last read, it was great to dive into a great mystery by Hakan Nesser. The Unlucky Lottery follows a group of old friends who finally hit it big on the lottery on their celebratory evening. The next morning, one of the friends is dead, another missing.

With Chief Inspector VanVeeteren still on sabbatical and only offering occasional advice, Inspector Munson must work the case with his team with very little clues why one of the men was stabbed repeatedly and excessively to death in his own bed. When his wife pleads guilty, the pieces seem almost but not quite together and Munson keeps looking for further confirmation of the murderer.

As always, this Scandanavian mystery has a slow, steady pace with several turns along the way. I enjoyed the unveiling of the murderer but the inspector and the last vignette of peace.

Read April 2017

The Inspector and Silence

Several years ago I started writing down all the books I’d read so that I wouldn’t accidentally read a book more than once. About 2 1/2 years ago, I moved it to a blog to make it easier. This is my 147th post documented on this blog.

The entire time I was reading The Inspector and Silence by Hakan Nesser, I felt like I knew the story. In fact, I checked this blog multiple times to see if I entered the name of the novel or author incorrectly. It was nowhere to be found, so I kept reading thinking that I’d read too many mysteries and they started blurring together.

This is a great novel about how cults can rule their followers, how great detectives have a hard time getting over their own prejudices, and how the murder of young children can devastate a community. And again, the whole time the novel felt familiar. I guessed the killer when I didn’t think there were any clues pointing in that direction. But I kept going because this writing style and social critique was such a joy to read.

I finally pulled out my handwritten book journal and surprise, surprise, I read this book back in September 2012, over 3 1/2 years and more than 150 books ago.

Still a great read and I really should trust my instinct more.

Read again April 2016.

The Weeping Girl

In Hakan Nesser’s The Weeping Girl the past defines the present. Over 15 years ago, Mikaela lost her father but it isn’t until her 18th birthday that her mother explains the crime he committed before he lost his mind. Determined to learn about his past, Mikaela travels to the coast to visit her father for the first time in her remembered life.

Along the way, Mikaela meets DI Ewa Moreno, who is on her way to holiday with her new boyfriend. Ewa must first make a short detour to interview a notorious criminal who will only speak with her.

After departing from Mikaela and finishing her interview, Ewa learns that Mikaela has gone missing. Supposedly on vacation, Ewa cannot walk away from finding out what happened to the girl she met on the train. Ewa must determine the past truth to find out what happened to Mikaela and its not what everyone supposed.

This was a gripping read and a great glimpse into a small Swedish vacation town.

Read October 2015