The Fault in Our Stars

John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars is a tragic love story between two teenagers, Hazel and Augustus, who both have battled cancer. Augustus lost his legs to cancer but is in remission. Hazel undergoes an experimental treatment that keeps her cancer at bay but keeps her perpetually weak and requiring oxygen. Hazel had been terminal prior to the treatment and still lives life separated from her peers. Her mother makes her attend a cancer group for kids where she meets the charismatic Augustus.

This is a teenager’s story written for teenagers, but there’s a lot to like about this book. Most of the main characters are suffering and dealing with issues that I, as an adult, have yet to come across, yet they are still so young and immature and hopeful. There’s a lot in the book is unrealistic but it allows the characters to experience places that they wouldn’t have otherwise. One way the two connect is by reading and loving a fictional story about a kid with cancer, An Imperial Affliction. Not only can they both relate to the story of cancer, but the author left the ending ambiguous. As if the kid just died while writing it and there was no more to know.

I read quite a few reviews that stated that both the characters were unbelievably intelligent and thats what makes their conversations so interesting. But reading this as an adult and having been around kids who have been sheltered from normal childhood things, I don’t think its their intelligence that makes it so well written. I think Green gets that these are kids who had to grow up quick. These are kids that spent an abnormal amount of time hanging around with adults and not enough time with kids. But these are still kids. Hoping to grow up. Hoping that tomorrow will be a little bit better, or at least not a little bit worse. And Green gets us to hope with these young souls that the world won’t be a horrid place filled with hospitals and treatments.

While this is a very sad book, about sad things, the sweetness of the romance and young love fill the book with hope. I would recommend this book, another one with a box of tissues, to everyone. Not just the young adult crowd.

Read January 2015.

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